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Truth is not determined by a Vote.

Truth doesn't change.


Monday, December 23, 2013

Important Blog Notice

Starting today, I will post this blog content on Facebook,
 http://www.facebook.com/christine.schult

and on Twitter http://twitter.com/ACatholicView

I will continue to post reviews of music, books and movies at  Catholic Media Review  http://catholicmediareview.blogspot.com/


This will allow me to reach an even broader audience than during the 9 years I have been blogging.

I hope to see you online at these sites!  Thanks, Christine

Saturday, December 21, 2013

St. Peter Canisius

The Saint of the Day for December 21 is St. Peter Canisius.

Peter Canisius, the remarkable Jesuit who almost single-handedly reevangelized Central Europe, founded dozens of colleges, contributed to the rebirth of Catholicism by his prodigious writings, and laid the groundwork for the Catholic Reformation north of the Alps. He was born at Nijmegen, Holland, in 1521, and his father was an instructor to princes in the court of the duke of Lorraine. St. Peter Canisius was part of a movement for religious reform as a very young man and in 1543, after attending a retreat given by Blessed Peter Favre, joined the Jesuits and was the eighth professed member of the Society of Jesus.

He worked first in the city of Cologne, becoming a spokesman for the Catholic party. He became a consultor to the cardinal of Augsburg at the Council of Trent and in 1547 was called by St. Ignatius to Rome. He was sent to Sicily to teach, then, after his solemn profession in Rome, was sent back to Germany as the first superior of the German province of the Jesuits.

Peter next began to restore and found colleges, first in Vienna and Prague, and then in Munich, Innsbruck, and throughout northern Germany. He attracted vocations to the Jesuits, and the society began to flourish in Central Europe. He organized the Jesuits into a compact unit and made the society a leading force in the Counter-Reformation. He was in contact with all the Catholic leaders in Germany, and wrote fourteen hundred letters giving support to those laboring for reform. He was the adviser of the emperor and the confidante of three popes. He was consulted by papal legates and nunciatures and was a severe critic of religious and clerical life in post-Reformation Germany.

He recommended far-reaching reforms and had a profound effect upon the education and spiritual life of the clergy. Through his efforts, seminaries were founded, and the popes sent him on important diplomatic missions. In the midst of his many labors, he edited and published editions of the Fathers of the Church, catechisms, spiritual manuals, and textbooks that went into countless editions even in his own lifetime.

He died on December 21, 1597, at Fribourg, Switzerland, and was canonized and declared a Doctor of the Church in 1925.

Friday, December 20, 2013

Music Review: "A New Day" by Steve Angrisano


It was a treat to listen to this CD, which features Steve's beautiful guitar playing and smokey voice ('smokey' is not a word I use often,  but it accurately describes his voice, and it is used in the most complimentary manner :)

There is a lot of bible reference:
'Psalm 40: Here I am Lord' is obviously based on that Psalm
'Magnificat' is the well-known visitation of Mary to Elizabeth 
'Remain in Me, I Am the Vine' resounds the words of Jesus himself

The tempo is fairly consistent across most of the tracks, with a couple of tracks, such as 'Alleluia! Love Is Alive' and 'May Your Kingdom Come' using a faster tempo.

The guitar playing is also appropriate for each track, using soothing notes and powerful chords.

The most important aspect of the CD for me is that it remains totally focused on the Lord.

It was a pleasure to review this CD, and I highly recommend it.

I think Steve's greatest asset is his voice.



Saint Dominic of Silos

The Saint of the Day for December 20 is Saint Dominic of Silos.

Saint Dominic was born in 1000 in CaƱas, Navarre, Spain. He was born a peasant, and as a youth worked as a shepherd until he entered the Benedictine monastery in Navarre. When Dominic refused to hand over the monastery lands at the King of Navarre’s demands, he was forced to leave the house with two other monks.

He fled to Old Castile and was welcomed by the king. He then entered the monastery of San Sebastian in Silos, an almost dilapidated abbey with a mediocre physical and spiritual regimen.

Within very little time, Dominic, who had been elected abbot, renewed the spirit of the monastery and rebuilt it’s structure, it’s finances, and it’s works of charity. Dominic was known for miracles of healing, which he obtained through prayer and for his work of ransoming Christian prisoners from the moors.

He died on December 10, 1073 in Silos, Spain.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

ChurchMilitant.TV News 12-19

'Duck Dynasty' star Phil Robertson on hiatus for anti-gay comments


If someone criticized Christians, would they be suspended?   Probably not....that would be considered "Freedom of Speech"...why isn't this?

Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson has been put on indefinite hiatus by A&E after making anti-gay remarks in the January issue of GQ.

"We are extremely disappointed to have read Phil Robertson's comments in GQ, which are based on his own personal beliefs and are not reflected in the series Duck Dynasty," A&E said in a statement to USA TODAY. "His personal views in no way reflect those of A+E Networks, who have always been strong supporters and champions of the LGBT community. The network has placed Phil under hiatus from filming indefinitely."

And in the story, titled "What the Duck?" Phil Robertson, founder of the Duck Commander company and patriarch at the heart of A&E's hit reality show, doesn't hold back in talking about his beliefs. Much to the dismay of GLAAD.

"We're Bible-thumpers who just happened to end up on television. ... You put in your article that the Robertson family really believes strongly that if the human race loved each other and they loved God, we would just be better off. We ought to just be repentant, turn to God, and let's get on with it, and everything will turn around."


And on the subject of sin, he says:

"Start with homosexual behavior and just morph out from there. Bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men," he says. Then he paraphrases Corinthians: "Don't be deceived. Neither the adulterers, the idolaters, the male prostitutes, the homosexual offenders, the greedy, the drunkards, the slanderers, the swindlers — they won't inherit the kingdom of God. Don't deceive yourself. It's not right."

He goes on to say, "It seems like, to me," a woman "would be more desirable ...That's just me. I'm just thinking: There's more there! She's got more to offer. I mean, come on, dudes! You know what I'm saying? But hey, sin: It's not logical, my man. It's just not logical."

story

Blessed Pope Urban V

The Saint of the Day for December 19 is Blessed Pope Urban V.


Blessed Pope Urban V was born Guillaume de Grimoard at Grisac in Languedoc, 1310. He studied canon law and theology in Avignon and became a Benedictine monk. He was named abbot of his monastery in 1352, and served as a papal diplomat and was eventually sent as an ambassodor to various locations. He also served as a bishop around Italy and throughout Europe.

He was elected pope in 1362 while on diplomatic business, even though he was not a cardinal. His reign was blessed by his peacekeeping activity between the French and Italian kings, the founding of many universities, his zeal for the crusades and his decision to return the papacy to Rome and end the Avignon exile of the popes.

However, the breakout of war between England and France forced him to return to Avignon on a peacekeeping mission. He died on his return to Avignon, and his body, which had been buried at Avignon, was then transferred to Marseille according to his own wishes, and his tomb became the site of many miracles. He died on December 19, 1370.

He always had a Benedictine spirit, and even wore his monk’s habit as Pope. His virtue and honesty were noted, especially in a Europe plagued by scandal and corruption. It is said that as he lay dying he called the people to surround his deathbed, saying “the people must see how popes die.”

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

ChurchMilitant.TV News 12-18-2013

Archbishop cooperates with investigation over 'touching' charge

I believe this accusation is complete nonsense.  I think Bishop Nienstedt is a good Bishop.  I still listen to a recording of the Rosary he made while Bishop of New Ulm, with members of the Diocese.

Archbishop John Nienstedt has temporarily stepped down and is cooperating in a police investigation involving a claim that he inappropriately touched a young man during a group photo four years ago.

In a Dec. 17 letter, the Saint Paul and Minneapolis archbishop denied the charge made by a male youth claiming that his buttocks were inappropriately touched after a 2009 confirmation ceremony in the archdiocese.

“True, I am a sinner, but my sins do not include any kind of abuse of minors,” the archbishop wrote. “I have met victims and I know the lasting damage that such abuse causes.”

He stated that his normal practice is to stand for group photos “with one hand on my crozier (staff) and the other either on the right shoulder of the newly confirmed or on my pallium (the short stole), which hangs from my chest.”

“I do that deliberately and there are hundreds of photographs to verify that fact,” he said.

The archbishop said he does not know the identity of the accuser, but maintained that “this allegation is absolutely and entirely false.”

“I have never once engaged in any inappropriate contact with a minor and I have tried to the very best of my ability to serve this Archdiocese and the church faithfully, with honor and due regard for the rights of all, even those with whom I disagree,” he said.

story

Saint Gatian of Tours

The Saint of the Day for December 18 is Saint Gatian of Tours.

Not much is known about the life of Saint Gatian, but we do know that he was the first bishop of Tours in France, and is said to be a disciple of Saint Denis of Paris. Arriving in a pagan land, completely untouched by the Good News, Gatian scattered the first seeds of the faith in the region of Tours, laying the foundations of the Church in the city of the great Saint Martin.

Saint Gatian died in 337.




Tuesday, December 17, 2013

ChurchMilitant.TV News 12-17

Vatican Chief Justice: Denying Communion to Nancy Pelosi “Makes Perfect Sense”

It would be great if the Priests that give them Communion would adhere to Cardinal Burke's directions.

Catholics across the United States have for years wondered if and when pro-abortion “Catholics” like Nancy Pelosi or John Kerry would be told not to present themselves for Communion because they are out of step with Catholic Church teachings on the sanctity of human life.

Cardinal Raymond Burke, the former archbishop of St. Louis and now the chief justice at the Vatican’s highest court saying prohibiting Pelosi and Kerry from receiving Communion”makes perfect sense,” according to a new interview Burke gave to EWTN.

story


Check out the images that made 2013 an unforgettable year at the Vatican

St. Olympias

The Saint of the Day for December 17 is St. Olympias.

Born sometime between 360-365, this pious, charitable, and wealthy disciple of St. John Chrysostom came from an illustrious family in Constantinople. Her father (called by the sources Secundus or Selencus) was a "Count" of the empire. One of her ancestors, Ablabius, filled the consulor office in 331, and was also praetorian prefect of the East.

As Olympias was not thirty years of age in 390, she cannot have been born before 361. Her parents died when she was quite young, and left her an immense fortune. In either 384 or 385 she married Nebridius, Prefect of Constantinople. St. Gregory of Nazianzus, who had left Constantinople in 381, was invited to the wedding, but wrote a letter excusing his absence (Ep. cxciii, in P.G., XXXVI, 315), and sent the bride a poem (P.G., loc. cit., 1542 sqq.). Within a short time Nebridius died, and Olympias was left a childless widow. She steadfastly rejected all new proposals of marriage, determining to devote herself to the service of God and to works of charity. Nectarius, Bishop of Constantinople (381-97), consecrated her deaconess.

On the death of her husband, the emperor had appointed the urban prefect administrator of her property, but in 391 (after the war against Maximus) he restored to her the administration of her large fortune. She built beside the principal church of Constantinople a convent, into which three relatives and a large number of maidens withdrew with her to consecrate themselves to the service of God. When St. John Chrysostom became Bishop of Constantinople in 398, he acted as spiritual guide of Olympias and her companions, and, as many undeserving approached the kind-hearted deaconess for support, he advised her as to the proper manner of utilizing her vast fortune in the service of the poor (Sozomen, "Hist. eccl.", VIII, ix; P.G., LXVII, 1540). Olympias resigned herself wholly to Chrysostom's direction, and placed at his disposal ample sums for religious and charitable objects. Even the most distant regions of the empire received her benefactions to churches and the poor.

When Chrysostom was exiled, Olympias supported him in every possible way, and remained a faithful disciple, refusing to enter into communion with his unlawfully appointed successor. Chrysostom encouraged and guided her through his letters, of which seventeen are extant (P.G., LII, 549 sqq.). These are a beautiful memorial of the noble-hearted, spiritual daughter of the great bishop.

Olympias was also exiled, and died a few months after Chrysostom on July 25, 408, probably at Nicomedia. After her death she was venerated as a saint. A biography dating from the second half of the fifth century, which gives particulars concerning her from the "Historia Lausiaca" of Palladius and from the "Dialogus de vita Joh. Chrysostomi", proves the great veneration she enjoyed. During he riot of Constantinople in 532, the convent of St. Olympias and the adjacent church were destroyed.

Emperor Justinian had it rebuilt, and the prioress, Sergia, transferred there the remains of the foundress from the ruined church of St. Thomas in Brokhthes, where she had been buried. We possess an account of this translation by Sergia herself. The feast of St. Olympias is celebrated in the Greek Church on July 24, and in the Roman Church on December 17.

Source: The Catholic Encyclopedia